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The Las Vegas Valley area residents of Clark County live in the most populous county in Nevada. Las Vegas has been the county seat since 1908. Clark County is a major tourist destination having 150,000 hotel and motel rooms. The Colorado River forms the county's southeastern boundary, with Hoover Dam forming Lake Mead along much of its length. Las Vegas is frequently, yet incorrectly labeled a valley. By definition, Greater Las Vegas is a land basin or bowl, surrounded by four mountain ranges, with nearby Mount Charleston being the highest elevation at 11,918 ft, located to the northwest. Other than the forests on Mount Charleston, the geography in Clark County is a desert. Creosote bushes are the main native vegetation, and the mountains are mostly rocky with little vegetation. The city of Las Vegas is located in an arid basin surrounded by mountains varying in color from pink to rust to gray. City elevation is around 2030 feet above sea level. The Spring Mountains lie to the west. As befits a desert, much of the landscape is rocky and dusty. Within the city, however, there are a great deal of lawns, trees, and other greenery.

Las Vegas' climate is typical of the Mojave Desert, in which it is located, marked with hot summers, mild winters, abundant sunshine year-round, and very little rainfall. High temperatures in the 90s °F are common in the months of May, June, and September and temperatures normally exceed 100 °F (38 °C) most days in the months of July and August, with very low humidity, frequently under 10%. Showers occur less frequently in the spring or autumn. July through September, the Mexican Monsoon often brings enough moisture from the Gulf of California across Mexico and into the southwest to cause afternoon and evening thunderstorms. Although winter snow is usually visible from December to May on the mountains surrounding Las Vegas, it rarely snows in the city itself.

The name Las Vegas is often applied to the unincorporated areas of Clark County that surround the city, especially the resort areas on and near the Las Vegas Strip. This 4½ mi stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard is mostly outside the Las Vegas city limits, in the unincorporated towns of Paradise and Winchester. A concerted effort has been made by city officials to diversify the Las Vegas economy from tourism by attracting light manufacturing, banking, and other commercial interests. Having been late to develop an urban core of any substantial size, Las Vegas has retained very affordable real estate prices in comparison to nearby urban centers. Consequently, the city has recently enjoyed an enormous boom both in population and in tourism. The urban area has grown outward so quickly that it is beginning to run into Bureau of Land Management holdings along its edges, increasing land values enough that medium- and high-density development is beginning to occur closer to the core.

A major part of the city economy is based on tourism, including gambling. The primary drivers of the Las Vegas economy have been the confluence of tourism, gaming, and conventions that in turn feed the retail and dining industries. Several companies involved in the manufacture of electronic gaming machines, such as slot machines, are located in the Las Vegas area. The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, a countywide agency, handle tourism marketing and promotion. Many technology companies have either relocated to Las Vegas or were created there. For various reasons, Las Vegas has had a high concentration of technology companies in electronic gaming and telecommunications industries.

The population of Clark County is 1,375,765 people with 512,253 households, and 339,623 families, which 31.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.17. Recent estimates suggest that Las Vegas’ population has since surpassed that of Atlanta, Nashville, and Louisville, to place it 22nd in rank and is likely to surpass Milwaukee and possibly a few other cities to reach the top 20 by the time of the 2010 Census. The median age is 34 years and for every 100 females there were 103.50 males. The median income is $45,000- $50,000. Las Vegas (often abbreviated to "Vegas") is the most populous city in the state of Nevada and an internationally known vacation, shopping, entertainment, and gambling destination. It was established in 1905 and officially became a city in 1911. It is the largest U.S. city founded in the 20th century.

Welcome to Las Vegas Website and Clark County, Nevada Website. Here you will find valuable information about Las Vegas and Clark County, Nevada, including coupons, restaurants, shopping, hotels, local businesses, transportation, real estate, public services, dining, salons, schools, sports, automotive, banking, shops, business, healthcare, relocation, travel, tourism, and vacations in Alunite, Arden, Blue Diamond, Boulder Bay, Boulder City, Bunkerville, Cactus Springs, Cal Nev Ari, Cottonwood Cove, East Las Vegas, Echo Bay, Fort Mohave Indian Reservation, Glendale, Goodsprings, Henderson, Indian Springs, Jean, The Lakes, Las Vegas, Laughlin, Lee Canyon, Logandale, Mesquite, Moapa, Mount Charleston, Mountain Springs, Nellis AFB, Nelson, North Las Vegas, Overton, Overton Beach, Primm, Riverside, Sandy Valley, Searchlight and Sloan. Places of interest in Las Vegas and Clark County include Laughlin/Bullhead City International Airport, Nellis Air Force Base, McCarran International Airport, Boulder City Municipal Airport, Southern Nevada Vocational Technical Center, Nevada Southern University, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, UNLV, Sky Corral Airport, Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center, Mountain View Hospital, Lake Mead Hospital, Las Vegas Convention Center, Jewish Community Center, Lost City Museum, Overton Museum, War Memorial Building, Swim Beach, North Beach, Boulder Beach, Belsmeir Beach, Bowman Dam, Honeybee Dam, Rose Tank, Overton Municipal Airport, Porters Airfield, Hoover Dam, Lake Mead Park, Southern Nevada Zoo & Botanical Park, Las Vegas Motor Speedway and Wild Island Family Adventure Park.

 
 
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